Gospel Reflection: Solemnity of Our Lord
Malvern Minute

 

SOLEMNITY OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST, KING OF THE UNIVERSE

NOVEMBER 26, 2017 

Alleluia, Alleluia.

Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!

Blessed is the kingdom of our father David that is to come!

Alleluia, Alleluia.

 

A reading from the holy Gospel according to St. Matthew 25: 31-46

Jesus said to his disciples: “When the Son of Man comes in his glory
and all the angels with him, he will sit upon his glorious throne, and all the nations will be assembled before him.   And he will separate them one from another, as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats. He will place the sheep on his right and the goats on his left.

Then the king will say to those on his right, ‘Come, you who are blessed by my Father.  Inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world.  For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, a stranger and you welcomed me, naked and you clothed me, ill and you cared for me, in prison and you visited me.’


Then the righteous will answer him and say, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you drink?  When did we see you a stranger and welcome you, or naked and clothe you?  When did we see you ill or in prison, and visit you?’  And the king will say to them in reply, ‘Amen, I say to you, whatever you did for one of the least brothers of mine, you did for me.’ 

 

Then he will say to those on his left, ‘Depart from me, you accursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels.  For I was hungry and you gave me no food, I was thirsty and you gave me no drink, a stranger and you gave me no welcome, naked and you gave me no clothing, ill and in prison, and you did not care for me.’


Then they will answer and say, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or naked or ill or in prison, and not minister to your needs?’


He will answer them, ‘Amen, I say to you, what you did not do for one of these least ones, you did not do for me.’ And these will go off to eternal punishment, but the righteous to eternal life.”

The Gospel of the Lord

 

 

REFLECTION

Today, we celebrate the conclusion of the Liturgical Year, the last Sunday of Ordinary Time.  Next Sunday we begin the beautiful Liturgical Seasons of Advent and Christmas.

 

In 1925, with an encyclical entitled Quas Primas (In the First), Pope Pius XI instituted this solemn feast of Christ the King.  With this encyclical and feast, the Church confronted the evil spirits of secularism, the idolatry of man worshipping himself and his physical world as the ONLY reality!  Secularism continues today, and in many ways it has grown stronger as more and more individuals isolate their activities and lives from God.  It appears that man, more and more worships only himself, and even Sunday has deteriorated into just another day of the week … no longer: The Lord’s Day!

 

Secularism does not have just a passive influence on our culture and society.  In our own time, it has become an aggressive force that desires to push people of faith, especially Christians off to the margins of society, and to remove God from all social consciousness.   Christianity is accused of not only being irrelevant, but even problematic. References to God and Christ are seen as intrusions into individuals’ personal lives.  Prayer has been withdrawn from almost all public functions, and efforts continue to remove from the Pledge of Allegiance the words: … under God.  Even Merry Christmas, Christ’s Mass is being replaced by Happy Holidays.  The excuse given is that the greeting, happy holidays, is less offensive and more culturally inclusive.  And so in response to a world that makes room for everyone else but God, Catholics boldly celebrate that Jesus Christ is king of our hearts, our lives, and the WHOLE universe!  In many ways this Solemnity is more important than ever.

 

Today, the Gospel of Saint Matthew is proclaimed to set the record straight: people were and are created in the image of God, and not the other way around.  God is the source of life and love, and He rightfully expects that we imitate Him in His goodness … For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, a stranger and you welcomed me, naked and you clothed me, ill and you cared for me, in prison and you visited me.

 

In a dramatic image Christ the King assembles all the peoples of the world before Him for judgment.   He is the Good Shepherd and He knows His sheep and goats, and He separates them into two groups.  The ones who embraced the weak and the needy are welcomed: Come, you who are blessed by my Father!   The ones who separated themselves by selfishness from the weak and the needy are cursed: Depart from me, you accursed!

 

Today’s feast is not designed to scare us into submission.  Today’s feast proclaims the Good News of Salvation: God the Father showers His goodness on the good and the bad, says Jesus Christ, and the Good Lord expects His children to treat each other with the same degree of respect, love and goodness.   God is Lord, and Man is not God!  God’s ways bring life and love; a world without God brings death and hatred!

 

Jesus Christ is King not by the world’s standards of power and prestige; Jesus Christ is King because He alone is Lord of the eternal kingdom. 

 

Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!

Blessed is the kingdom of our father David that is to come!

 

ENCOUNTERING THE DIVINE PHYSICIAN

HEALING OF THE PARALYTIC (LUKE 5: 17-26)

Consider joining the Men and Women of Malvern by deepening your personal relationship with Jesus and your commitment as a disciple through a weekend retreat.  See our website for details: MalvernRetreat.com

 

addiction-support family find-us history grief-or-loss marriage mens storiespng testimonial womens young-adulthood healing our-grounds prayers calendar malvern-live retreats2go plan-your-visit donate